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Australia’s largest cast bronze figurative sculpture unveiled at Canberra Airport

A 7.5 metre, 3.8 ton bronze work by Australian sculptor Andrew Rogers has been unveiled at Canberra Airport by Federal Minister for the Arts, Simon Crean.

“Andrew Rogers’ work is well-known throughout the world. To have a sculpture of this scale at Canberra Airport, the gateway to our national capital, reaffirms this city’s commitment to the arts,” Mr Crean said.

“Private sector contributions like the commissioning of this significant piece are critical to the cultural life of our nation. This is not just a work of art but a demonstration of the capacity of private individuals and corporations to enrich the lives of all Australians through their philanthropic support of the arts.”

Attending the unveiling, sculptor Andrew Rogers described the commission as unique.
“The enterprise of Canberra Airport and its commercial surrounds is a major undertaking and different to most. I am pleased my sculpture is part of it,” Mr Rogers said.
“The vision to elevate the Airport and provide a stimulating point of difference for people is
something that on the larger scale can improve the world.

“For me sculpture is not just about the creation of an object. It is an expression of the heart.

“I am pleased to be part of the vision at Canberra Airport and to be able to be responsible to help bring it into being.” Canberra Airport Managing Director Stephen Byron said the sculpture had been commissioned to act as a focus for the southern courtyard at Canberra Airport and was the eighth sculpture to be installed in the airport precinct.
“Canberra Airport has set out from the beginning to show that an airport can be so much more than simply a piece of national transport infrastructure. Our program of commissioned public art is an important part of that approach,” Mr Byron said.

“People coming to Canberra ought to have their spirits lifted and be inspired on arrival in the national capital; this sculpture will take their breath away. It’s a very, very powerful work.”